Fashion.Art.Books

An archive of my ever expanding book and print collection

Tag: Tate Modern

Daido Moriyama – Menu printing show

Last week saw the opening of the latest exhibition at Tate Modern, William Klein + Daido Moriyama. Both photographers are renowned for their gritty depiction of urban life on the streets of  New York and Tokyo; in this exhibition the similarities in their approach to documenting the city are explored in great detail through works that cover the 50’s to the present day. A particular focus of the Moriyama section, is the artists relationship with publishing. He is a prolific producer of books, producing over 85 books and magazines during his career, some of which have become highly collectible.

To coincide with the show, Moriyama recreated his 1974 Printing Show in conjunction with Goliga and Tate Modern. In the original show, Moriyama set up a wall of images taken during a visit to New York and a bank of photocopiers. Visitors were then allowed to select images that would then be printed and bound in to a unique book entitled Another Country in New York. For this show, entitled Menu, Moriyama mounted 60 double-page spreads on the walls of the East Room at Tate Modern and allowed ticket holders to select 20 of these images, in whichever order they wanted, which were then bound inside a silkscreened cover (choice of two covers, created during the event). Moriyama was also on hand to sign the finished book. The whole process created a totally unique book, I would be amazed if any two books were the same!

The welcome sign

The wall of images

The tough job of making your selection!

Silkscreening of the book covers

One of the silkscreens

The two book cover options

Where the book was assembled

Daido Moriyama signing the finished product

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Eva Hesse – SFMOMA Exhibition Catalogue

In 2002, San Francisco MOMA, in collaboration with Elisabeth Sussman, presented a retrospective of the work of German-born artist Eva Hesse. Hesse, born in 1936, migrated to the USA with her family in 1939 to escape Nazi Germany and settled in New York where she went on to study study art at a number of top institutes. After graduating from Yale she continued to develop her work and in 1963 had her first exhibition of works on paper. It was soon after this, following a move to Germany, that Hesse began creating sculptures, the medium for which she has become most known for. Her sculptural work, focusing on the use of latex, cloth, cord and fibre glass, continued up until her untimely death from a brain tumour in 1970, aged 34. During her short life she only ever had one one-person show of her sculptural works; it is only since her death that her genius and flair have been brought to the attention of a wider audience.

In perhaps the most seminal show of her work to date, the 2002 exhibition at SFMOMA exhibited not only her sculptural works but also her paintings and drawings which she continued to produce throughout her life. The exhibition brought together 150 pieces of her work and gave a fascinating insight into her body of work. After being exhibited at SFMOMA, the exhibition moved on to Germany and then Tate Modern in the UK. Due to the materials Hesse used for her sculptures, they are incredibly fragile and difficult to preserve; I imagine that it is unlikely there will ever be another exhibition of her work of this magnitude due to the logistical problems of transporting such delicate pieces. SFMOMA produced an in-depth catalogue of the exhibition that detailed all the works shown and gave a fascinating insight in to the life of the artist. In addition, it also discussed the difficulties in conserving Hesse’s work and how it might be preserved so that future generations can continue to enjoy her work. The catalogue is now out of print and is getting harder and harder to find.

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Eva Hesse - SFMOMA & Elisabeth Sussman

Taryn Simon – A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters

Taryn Simon recently had an exhibition at Tate Modern of her body of work entitled “A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters”. This work was produced over a four year time period and examines bloodlines and their associated stories. The work is divided into eighteen chapters and documents, among other things,  feuding families in Brazil, victims of genocide in Bosnia, the body double of Saddam Hussein’s son Uday, and the living dead in India. Each chapter is comprised of three segments: an annotation, a large portrait series depicting bloodline members and a second series containing photographic evidence. 817 portraits are systematically arranged within their chapters. The exhibition has since been shown in Berlin and will move to MoMA, New York in May 2012. I highly recommend you check it out if you can.

Mack Books, one of my favourite independent publishing houses, published the book to accompany the exhibition. The book is as large as the body of work, 864 pages containing 1000 images and weighing in at over 10lbs. As with all Mack Books, the attention to detail in the production and the quality of the book is fantastic.

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

Taryn Simon - A Living Man Declared Dead

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