Fashion.Art.Books

An archive of my ever expanding book and print collection

Category: Exhibition

Elizabeth Price – Here

In the run up to Christmas, Studio Voltaire opened up House of Voltaire, a pop up shop in London’s Mayfair. This biennial event raises funds for the gallery through offering unique artists editions created especially for the shop. One item on offer, was a risograph by 2012 Turner Prize winner, Elizabeth Price. The print was produced in an edition of 80, as the edition sell out the price increases, it is currently £75 and is available from the Studio Voltaire website here

Elizabeth Price

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Rinko Kawauchi – Approaching Whiteness

Last year I highlighted an event organised by Goliga to coincide with Rinko Kawauchi’s nomination for the Deutsche Borse prize and the accompanying exhibition at The Photographers Gallery in London. The event, Approaching Whiteness, allowed the visitor to select one of nine different scrolls that contained a series of images created by Rinko. The scroll was then screen printed with a design and colour of your choice and the title written on it in Japanese calligraphy. Finally, Rinko stamped the scroll and placed it in a custom made box. The event was hugely successful and it was hard to pick a scroll and design for the silkscreen, a lot of visitors were comparing choices before making their final decision! Videos for all the scrolls can be seen here, I chose Goldfish and Diamond Dust.

Rinko Kawauchi Scrolls Rinko Kawauchi Scrolls Rinko Kawauchi Scrolls Silkscreen

I chose a pearlescent colour for my pine needle pattern

I chose a pearlescent colour for my pine needle pattern

Rinko Kawauchi Scrolls Rinko Kawauchi Scrolls

Mel Bochner – If the Colour Changes exhibition

As I said in a previous post, it was a busy week for art lovers in London last week! Last Thursday was the opening night of American painter Mel Bochner’s exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery. This is the first time Bochner’s 45 year career has been exhibited on such a scale in the UK and, after seeing the exhibition, I can say it’s long overdue. From a lot of the press running up to the exhibition I was expecting it to be solely his text paintings on show, for which he is most famous. However, as you move through the galleries you see just how diverse his body of work is; after being greeted by the enormous Blah Blah Blah painting, created especially for this show, when you first enter, you move in to a space occupied by Theory of Painting, four squares made up of newspaper spreads sprayed bright blue in various configurations. Moving on, there are photographs, sculptures and more examples of his paintings; the largest gallery upstairs is dedicated to his Measurement and Thesaurus works. Overall, this is a great show, it has been curated brilliantly, and having seeing the full range of his work I now have an increased respect for Bochner’s work. The show is on until December 30th and I definitely recommend you check it out.

 

Daido Moriyama – Menu printing show

Last week saw the opening of the latest exhibition at Tate Modern, William Klein + Daido Moriyama. Both photographers are renowned for their gritty depiction of urban life on the streets of  New York and Tokyo; in this exhibition the similarities in their approach to documenting the city are explored in great detail through works that cover the 50’s to the present day. A particular focus of the Moriyama section, is the artists relationship with publishing. He is a prolific producer of books, producing over 85 books and magazines during his career, some of which have become highly collectible.

To coincide with the show, Moriyama recreated his 1974 Printing Show in conjunction with Goliga and Tate Modern. In the original show, Moriyama set up a wall of images taken during a visit to New York and a bank of photocopiers. Visitors were then allowed to select images that would then be printed and bound in to a unique book entitled Another Country in New York. For this show, entitled Menu, Moriyama mounted 60 double-page spreads on the walls of the East Room at Tate Modern and allowed ticket holders to select 20 of these images, in whichever order they wanted, which were then bound inside a silkscreened cover (choice of two covers, created during the event). Moriyama was also on hand to sign the finished book. The whole process created a totally unique book, I would be amazed if any two books were the same!

The welcome sign

The wall of images

The tough job of making your selection!

Silkscreening of the book covers

One of the silkscreens

The two book cover options

Where the book was assembled

Daido Moriyama signing the finished product

M/M Paris – Carpetalogue

Last Thursday was the beginning of a busy weekend for art lovers in London as the art-world descended on the city for the Frieze art fair. Whilst the fair got under way in Regents park, galleries all over London opened new shows. Top of my list was the M/M Paris exhibition at Gallery Libby Sellers. It had been six years since M/M Paris last exhibited in London, so this was a long overdue opportunity to see their work up close and in the flesh. For this exhibition, Carpetalogue, M/M Paris recreated four of their works as enormous hand made carpets. The carpets took their designs from a variety of sources in the M/M Paris archive including their icon The Agent, pages from a sketch book and a Givenchy invite. The carpets were presented like pages of a book on multicoloured wooden frames (the weight of the carpets was so great that the frames needed some unexpected reinforcement to cope with them).

In addition to the carpets, M/M Paris were also launching their new retrospective monograph The M to M of M/M Paris. Both Mathias and Michaël were on hand to sign copies of this and a selection of their other books, including two new limited edition books, Slatur and The Givenchy Files (which I will post about later). For those of you in London you can visit a pop-up shop in the gallery where you can buy a wide range of new and hard to find books and objects from M/M Paris, for those of you around the world you can buy direct from M/M Paris here.

The back of the carpet and the frame

Pop-up shop to fulfil all your M/M Paris desires

Francis Alys – Untitled Print

dOCUMENTA 13 is a festival that runs from June to September in Kassel, Germany and brings together over 300 participants. The festival is spread across numerous sites and includes exhibitions, lectures, seminars and poetry readings presented by artists and academics from all over the world. Among the artists participating in this festival is Francis Alys who is showing a new work commissioned by dOCUMENTA. Belgian-born artist Alys is internationally renowned and recently had a retrospective at Tate Modern which was highly acclaimed. His work, which spans painting, film, sound and installation, has a strong political theme and often highlights social and political injustices. For his commission, Alys created the film Reel-Unreel which sees two children pushing film reels through the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan; the film can be viewed here and is well worth watching. The film is a commentary on an event that occurred in Afghanistan in 2001, I won’t say what as the story is part of the video and isn’t explained until the end.

To coincide with the festival, Alys has produced a limited edition print; as far as I am aware this is a rare event, I have been unable to track down any other edition prints by Alys, so it is sure to be a collectors item. The print, produced in an edition of 200, is housed inside a cardboard portfolio that is held closed by a ribbon. The print itself measures 21.5x28cm and is stamped and signed on the front. At present it is unavailable to buy through the dOCUMENTA website but can be ordered through the Walther Konig website here.

Edition print for dOCUMENTA Reel-Unreel

Edition print for dOCUMENTA Reel-Unreel

Stephen Gill – Outside In Print

Earlier this week, the 2012 Brighton Photo Biennial was announced at the Photographers Gallery in London, and yet again looks set to be a great event. The last Biennial had an incredible roster of artists, including Stephen Gill who exhibited his Outside In series, which I have previously featured. To accompany the exhibition and the book, Gill released a limited edition print which embodied the projects aims; as Gill described……

“My aim was to evoke the feeling of the area at the same time as describing its appearance….The results included some highly detailed macro recordings amongst and within the landscapes and portraits. I like to think of these photographs as in-camera photograms in which conflict or harmony has been randomly formed in the final image depending on where the objects landed….I also used a magnifying glass to concentrate the Brighton sunlight onto some of the negatives in order to etch markings directly onto the image. Some of the negatives I dipped in the sea. I was imagining and hoping the finished series would be like the regurgitated contents of a giant vacuum cleaner.”

The print, an edition of 50, has sold out but he has two other prints from this series available on his website here

(P.S  The print isn’t this wonky, that’s just my bad angle!)

Richard Hamilton – Polaroids

I recently posted my Richard Hamilton Polaroid books (here), which documented Hamilton’s 34 year long project to have his portrait taken by every artist he met. In  2010, the Serpentine Gallery held an exhibition of Hamilton’s more political works to great acclaim; it turned out to be one of his last major exhibitions as he sadly passed away the following year. In conjunction with this exhibition, Hamilton revisited his Polaroid Portraits project and restored all the original images with the help of his son. These images were then offered as an edition to Serpentine patrons and visitors. However, rather than being able to choose which Polaroid you wanted Hamilton organised a raffle. Each person was allowed to buy a single raffle ticket for £145 (if i remember correctly) and towards the end of the exhibition Hamilton held an evening at the gallery where he raffled off each unique original print with the help of Roxy Music singer, Bryan Ferry. With our raffle tickets, we got Polaroids taken by the American artist Ron Kitaj and British Painter Stephen Buckley.

Anthony McCall – Between You and I

British born artist Anthony McCall was a central figure of the London Film-makers Co-operative in the 1970’s and was renowned for his filmed performances involving fire. After moving to New York in 1973, McCall embarked on a new series of Solid Light works, the most famous being Line Describing a Cone. Using rooms filled with a smoky haze, McCall projected beams of light that slowly pulsed and morphed, creating shapes that drew their footprint on the walls and floors of the space. At the end of the 70’s, McCall all but retired from the art world and his work faded in to history. It was only 20 years later, when McCall was reinvigorated by the possibilities of digital projection, that he started to make work again and reopened his Solid Light series. Around the same time, his work was enjoying somewhat of a renaissance and exhibited in major museum all over the world.

In 2007, the Serpentine Gallery presented a retrospective of his work, including film, drawings, photographs and scores, largely from McCall’s personal archive. This exhibition reinvigorated the UK art establishments interest in his work and he has since had a number of major exhibitions and commissions, including the upcoming piece Column, a spinning column of vapour cloud that will rise from the Wirral waters near Liverpool. To accompany his exhibition at the Serpentine, McCall produced a limited edition print of his Solid Light piece Between You and I. The print (53cm x 37.5cm) was produced in an edition of 150 and has since sold out although a similar print entitled Coupling can be bought from Peer here.

mccall_image.jpg

Yoko Ono – Serpentine Gallery Exhibition

Last night was the private view for Yoko Ono’s exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London, her first exhibition in London for more than 10 years. Prior to the opening, Ono sat down with art critic Waldemar Januszczak for a Q&A session in the pavillion that drew a large crowd. Afterwards, the gallery was opened and crowds queued all night to get a look at the exhibition.

The exhibition includes both new and previously exhibited works; outside the gallery, Yoko has installed Wish Tree where visitors are asked to write down their wishes, ask a friend to do the same and then tie them to the trees. Yoko Ono has been collecting these wishes for over 15 years and now has over one million. Inside, there are numerous films and installations, including the infamous Ceiling Painting that has become a symbol for John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s first meeting. In the central atrium a perspex maze turns the viewer into the observed object and a wall of screens show iconic films from throughout her career.

Central to the exhibition, and perhaps Ono’s grandest project to date, is Smile; an international project that asks people to upload geotagged images of themselves smiling which are then turned in to a film. You can find out about uploading your smile and being part of the project here.

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